Turning Pages (posted by Jane’s daughter)


My mother, Rev. Dr. Jane Claypool, made her transition out of physical form on 10/31/14.  I was lucky enough to be with her, so I know it was an instantaneous event – for which I am grateful.  However it was very unexpected, as she had just conquered pneumonia once again.  After writing her daily gratitude list, she finished up this blog last Friday morning before deciding to go the emergency room.  We had been laughing with a friend about Halloween and were having a good morning.  She had a new drawing too…..(I will post more of her drawings later).  A Celebration of Life memorial service will be held on 11/15/14.  Please call the Center for Spiritual Living Carlsbad at 760-434-9579 if you would like more information.  All Love To You…. Kate DuVivier

 

enjoy life jcTURNING PAGES:

I’ve been spending a lot of time talking about my life because Amanda, one of my dear helpers, asks me many questions. I suppose any life is fascinating when the audience is sixty years younger.

Amanda can’t imagine growing up without TV. She can’t imagine doing the wash before clothes dryers, or heating up food before microwaves. She is fascinated with black and white movies.

Since I am on a diet of happy stories, we often choose old movies. She loves the 1930 screwball comedies we watch in the evening and says they are better because the stories “have more talking.” I agree.

Of course, the very best movies were made in 1939, when I was only six years old, and Hollywood was at its triumphant height. I’ve told her that my three siblings and I went to the movies every Saturday afternoon and paid 12 cents to be admitted but I haven’t been clear on the dates. I started going to the movies alone in the 1940’s after World War Two. The films we saw as children included nasty propaganda pot boilers. I had nightmares about Germans chasing me until I was a woman in her thirties.

Turner Classic Movie channel skips many of those horribly prejudiced flicks. I use my DVR to skip all the war pictures. We all engage in some form of censorship, I suppose.

I imagine Amanda’s idea of my war years in the movie house is filled with Clark Gable tap dancing in   a European castle just before World War Two breaks out. Or maybe her favorite is Cary Grant taking prat falls before World War Two breaks out. Then there is Charlie Chaplin impersonating Hitler just before World War Two breaks out.

We know history is unreliable. For starters, it is written by the winners and winners see the picture from their viewpoint.

Our personal histories are also unreliable. We tend to romanticize our memories. When I talk to Amanda about my early years during the Depression, I don’t remember much but I speak as if it were a charming story. My parents become delightful young kids who struggled to keep their four children alive. I say things like, “They kept us together in the midst of the Troubles. They kept us alive!”

That’s true, of course and it is a fact that plenty of men left their wives and children behind to become hoboes. It is also true that some women starved to death and many children were sent to orphanages because their parents couldn’t feed them.

In the current version of my childhood, there is nothing about the humiliation of poverty and nothing of the shame when relatives brought groceries and deposited them on the table without a smile. That was also there but the story of the Depression years skips straight to a happy ending. World War Two broke out and there were plenty of jobs!

When I told this personal history story during my twenties and thirties, my story sounded very tragic. The reasons why my life was so tragic piled up until they took the form of a long, and twisted litany of despair. In those days I believed I was marked for tragedy.

It is true I had a difficult beginning with the early death of my young husband but it was also true that I had sixty or more years ahead of me. I wasn’t doomed to anything. I had plenty of choices along the way. In my twenties, I thought my story was over but it was just beginning.

That’s a common mistake. We tend to see wherever we are as the end of the story even though the story goes on and on. And on Life is always presenting us choices and if we miss the brass ring the first time, we usually get another turn to catch it again.

One of the most delightful discoveries about my current age is the fascinating changes and insights that present themselves. I’ve enjoyed many personal discoveries as I’ve moved along life’s pathway. In fact, I am now at a place where I understand that life is always presenting possibilities.

There is a famous poem by Robert Frost called the The Road Not Taken and it talks about taking the road less traveled. It ends with, “Two roads diverged in a wood, and I–I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference.”

It’s a great poem that says you always get more than one chance. If you have the consciousness to attract a choice of true love, you will have another chance later. Same is true of making a fortune. You’ll have more than one big chance.

I missed my chance to be a famous writer in the 1960’s but the chance returned in the 1980’s. The same pattern was also there in my search for true love. Life is a series of wonderful repetitive choices.

My life still offers plenty of choices. Last week, I wrote a blog about my stay in a nursing home. I had a choice to tell it like it was or simply be grateful to be home.

I might have skipped over the whole experience and written about any number of subjects including gratitude, or the power of supportive friendships. That would have an expected road for a retired minister of a Center For Spiritual Living Center.

When I started these blogs, I promised myself I’d be honest, as positive and helpful to readers as possible, and that my essays would be mostly about Science of Mind.

Most of all, I promised myself I’d be honest. All of those choices would have been honest. However, the stay in the nursing home was top of my mind and I was full of energy about how dreadful that place was.

I had some other choices that would have been slightly less honest; I could lie and say everything was wonderful, or I could write about some unrelated subject.

I chose the road less travelled by! I didn’t want to skip the subject because I was still steaming full of energy about my stay so I wrote what I wrote. You can read the blog, Miss Me?, in the archives.

I had other choices. I could have named the place but my understanding is that it is one of the best so the issues were generic. I could have called the nurses lazy but I could see they were trying hard and overworked.   As of now, I have received more comments about that blog than any I’ve ever written. They were all in agreement and several were interested in participating or starting a drumming circle. If you get a chance, take a look at the comments since they are truly honest and intelligent.

Looking back on your choices is always interesting. As I look back on the choice I made last week, I can see that I made a good choice and I’m glad I did. Maybe several readers will work on starting or participating in a drumming circle. I do believe that will help clients, their loved ones and nursing homes.

While we can’t always predict the outcome of our choices, an honest, well meaning choice can be effective. And if it doesn’t turn out well, you always have plenty of other choices to follow.

 

Ask Yourself

Am I looking at any difficult choices now?

What do I have to choose?

What do I want to do?

Are my possibilities honest?

Are my possibilities well meaning?


Miss Me?

changeMiss me? I have been in the hospital three times with pneumonia since 9/18 and then I was in skilled nursing for over two weeks. I’m back home now!

As I’ve aged, I’ve tried to be responsible and consider the needs of my loved ones as well as myself. I’ve done the right things. I have an end of life directive, a will, a power of attorney, and I even left a list of ideas for my memorial service.

I’ve also tried to rely on the words of my doctors and my daughter and not just insist that it’s my way or the highway. I really want to be a rational senior.

All my life I’ve heard about difficult elders and I was determined not to be one. But after my recent time in the nursing home, I saw that my tolerance of unpleasant conditions is definitely very limited.

I’ve always thought of myself as adaptable but I didn’t do too well on my nursing home stay. I hated it and I certainly let myself slip into reacting to conditions rather than being an independent actor. I only give myself a grade of C minus when it comes to managing my reactions to those nursing home conditions.

As one’s powers diminish, life gets more frustrating. Bottle caps resist turning. Names hide in closeted parts of the memory. Technology sprints into new worlds leaving the senior user far behind.

As one’s powers diminish, it is tempting to become more demanding and more childish. We sometimes make foolish choices. If you don’t believe me, read King Lear. For example, a father of one of my friend’s called her at 3 AM and insisted she drive over an hour, in the rain, to his nursing home; because he needed someone to fix the remote on his TV.

I don’t do things like that but I worry about it.

That said – I really hated the skilled nursing facility I was in and I’m afraid I wasn’t very grown up about it. Instead of practicing gratitude, I complained a great deal.

I’m still not finished complaining… My room was disorganized and no one ever put anything back in the same place twice. The nurses were pleasant although they were harried and often confused. They took 20 to 30 minutes to respond to my call. The food was terrible and I didn’t agree with the doctor’s treatment methods. Except for that – I hated the lack of mobility.

This nursing home had good ratings and I’m assured it is better than most. If this is one of the better ones, I don’t even want to think about the others. My two weeks there were extremely irritating. The staff made several mistakes that I caught and that was scary.

Part of my irritation came from being treated as though I were senile, I hate it when people say, “It’s time for our dinner” – worse yet, “our shower.” It is my dinner although you are welcome to it. It wasn’t anyone’s shower because they announced it by saying, “You missed your shower time”.

Sometimes it seemed to me it might be easier if I were senile but I can’t imagine that is a safe choice.

I’d be the first to admit I’m not well suited to being locked up and cared for. I was born to be free. I inherited the blood of the Wild West. My mother once helped her sister pull the plugs and escape a very big city hospital. They just yanked out the IV tubes and went home.

While incarcerated, I contemplated a similar action. I wheeled myself out to the front doors a few times and stared at my options but I couldn’t drive and it was a long way home. I stayed the course and endured the travail while the ghosts of my mother and aunt haunted and taunted me.

I came three days ago, and immediately called my dear friend and mentor, Rev. Marvis Rodrigues. She is a safe for me to complain to because she doesn’t judge and she has her own experiences. In fact, her life story is a testimony to courage and endurance, She was born with a severe anomaly and has suffered many hospitalizations because of a birth defect she never talks or complains about. She is a courageous friend and helps me keep things in perspective.

Rev. Marvis had a successful ministry despite being physically challenged and she is now retired. She told me a delightful story about visiting a friend who was in a nursing home and was just as frustrated as I was. Together, with the approval of the activity director of the nursing home, they devised a wonderful activity to relieve stress and express creativity.

Marvis and her wheelchair bound friend created a drumming circle for the rest of the residents who wanted to participate. Most of them were also using wheelchairs. She, and several church volunteers, donated drums and percussion instruments and the circle met weekly. Everyone got to express themselves while making music based on the rhythm of the heartbeat. What could be more healing? More basic? More fun?

The drumming circle allowed everyone, including the mentally and mobility challenged residents, to express their feelings. According to Rev. Marvis, “The process of pounding on a drum or shaking a rattle or tambourine allowed the residents to release pent up anger and frustration. Plus, they all ended up with a smile on their face. It became a favorite activity the residents looked forward to”

The activity director shared with Rev. Marvis that after a drumming session, the residents returned to their rooms happier, more relaxed, and they took very sound afternoon naps.

Rev. Marvis’s story sounded like a great idea and I decided it might be an activity I could use to clear up some of my negative feelings about the whole experience.

I have been disappointed at my reaction to the frustrations of the nursing skills center. Up until now, I haven’t had any way to release my emotions and move on. Now, I have decided to pursue creating drumming circles. I will begin by talking to some of the people in my Center for Spiritual Living about creating a drumming circle for a nursing home in our area.

If any of you readers are looking for an outreach project for yourself or your church, you might consider setting up a drumming circle in a neighborhood nursing home yourselves.

I think it will be a fairly simple project. Instruments are easy to find in toy shops. Or you can get creative and use metal or wooden spoons, and pots and pans. Very often the activity director of the nursing home will utilize the idea into a drum making activity with their residents using coffee cans. Your friends and church people will probably be happy to help supply the instruments.

Residents enjoy the music concerts provided in the afternoons more than any other activity I’ve seen in nursing homes. Drumming is a very primal form of music making and it seems as if it would be an easy activity to set up.

I want to release the negative aspects of my nursing home experience and move on in my own consciousness. I know that there is always a new choice and a new opportunity and I can release my frustration. I also know I am not alone; a drumming circle could be wonderful for others as well.

Let me know if the idea appeals to you. If you follow through in your own neighborhood, please keep me informed.


Ask Yourself

How do I release stress?

Does this idea appeal to me?

How might I follow through?

 

 


Deferred Dreams

nowLast week I heard my daughter speak for the first time as a Religious Science minister. I also helped edit another friend’s  wonderful new book.

Both these women were following up on long- held dreams and their victories were even sweeter because they’d carried their visions so long.

My daughter started to become a minister about 20 years earlier and abandoned the dream because her other commitments (raising kids and building a business were priorities). My friend started her book many years ago and delayed the project because she was so involved in her other ministerial duties and projects.

I don’t think either woman was discouraged about postponing their dream. I’m sure that they were both delighted when they dusted off their vision and went after it with enthusiasm later. I know they are both delighted they had the courage to reawaken their dream and breathe life into again.

One of the most famous poems in the English language, by Langston Hughes, asks what happens to a dream that gets put off.

What happens to a dream deferred?

Does it dry up 
like a raisin in the sun? 


 The poem goes on to offer even more dubious endings to the question that I won’t quote. It is the raisin in the sun image that captures our imagination. Doesn’t it seem as some of our long-held dreams are wrinkling with age?

Sometimes we use the idea that our dream is too old as an excuse not to pursue it. Certainly, some dreams do get too old. Your dream of making becoming a professional basketball star or ballet dancer might not be practical at forty. That’s true.

However, dreams can often be modified if you still hold some kernal of your desire. You might adapt the dream to current conditions and take dancing lessons for your personal pleasure and health and or play basketball in your neighborhood park.

Age is just an excuse for abandoning most of our dreams. You can get a teaching credential at fifty and put in twenty or more good years in the classroom. You can find true love at seventy and enjoy every day and night the rest of your time together. The person who denies herself the pleasure of attaining a long held dream just because of age is usually wrong.

Sometimes people abandon dreams because they didn’t make good sense in the first place and that’s a good thing. I wouldn’t encourage anyone to reach for his dream of being a professional gambler, wing walker, bungey jumper, lion tamer, bagpipe player, or many other youthful ambitions at any age.

Take a look at some of your youthful ambitions and they don’t seem as good an idea as they did then. For example, I wanted to be a fisherman when I was 12 and I abandoned the idea at 13 because I liked boys. While I have never regretted releasing my dream of being Captain Ahab, I might enjoy fishing off the pier.

I think there is something very special about attempting to fulfill earlier ambitions, even if the dream has to be modified. Actually, there are a lot of ideas about dreaming and failure out there in the ethers. Some people think we should always pursue our dreams and never give up. That’s not always the way life works. Things happen. We make other choices.

In my opinion, the 21 year old man who wants to be a Hollywood actor and marries his pregnant girlfriend instead makes a choice. He now sells insurance in Ft. Worth, TX and I can’t say his choice was good or bad. Nor do I know whether he is a success or failure. It isn’t the choice, but his attitude about the choice that creates his destiny.

If he blames his wife constantly, it was a bad choice for both of them. If he delayed his dream and is happy about it, then it was a good choice. If he modifies his dream later, by participating in little theater, he makes his choice and his success even better by feeding his soul.

We all seek happiness and success in life. We choose different avenues in the belief that we will find the way to those generic goals. Some of us believe we will be happy as soon as attain one or the other dreams we hold. We defer our happiness until we are married, or rich, or get the promotion, and we don’t know, (or we forget) that we can choose to be happy now.

I think some of us could be happier than we are if we understood that our attitude toward life is as important as what we  choose. I also believe some of us would be happier if we were able to finish, or resurrect, that pesky dream we’ve been carrying for a while.

I  know absolutely that we’d be happier if we stopped blaming choices we made in the past for our deferred dreams of today. Check to see if you are making excuses for your unhappiness because of a “missed boat” or because you “had to” do something else when you wanted to follow your bliss.

It might be instructive if we all made a list of the past dreams we have held that still tickle our fancy. Then we might take a look at one or more treasured dreams and ask ourselves if there is some way we can take action in the direction of one of those dreams.

Don’t use this activity to berate yourself for procrastination. Simply ask yourself if you have been putting off something you’d still like to attain. Perhaps if it is a college degree, you might find time to take one on-line class this semester. Perhaps if you wanted to write a book, you can set aside 10 hours a week to work on it.

If you have a special dream that you believe it is too late to fulfill, please make a point to be creative about modifying it. Even if you wanted to be a great opera singer and didn’t get to study in Europe, you can join the local University Chorus. Even if you wanted to have six children and have none, you can become a foster parent, or school volunteer.  Even if you wanted to make a million before you were 30, you can embark on the study of investments and follow through with smaller amounts.

Dreaming is a wonderful thing. It is normal not to be able to choose to fulfill every dream. Sometimes it is best to discard the old ones and get some new goals. Sometimes it truly thrilling to achieve a deferred dream. Why not get a new affirmation – No raisins in the sun for me.                                                                           

Ask Yourself

What dream would I like to resurrect?

How should I modify it?

What’s my plan of action?


Walking On Water

scan024A learned scholar visited some ignorant monks for several days, teaching them about the Bible. As the scholar sailed away from their island home, the monks ran across the ocean waters, shouting, “Come back! Come back! We forgot all you taught us!”

The point of this story is theory is not as important as actually using your learning.

School starts in Centers for Spiritual Living this month and I hope every reader will take a class so that he or she can actually get more of what he wants from life.

You don’t need a miracle. You don’t need to walk on water to benefit from classes. Any class that teaches you the basic ideas so that you can use them will make a great difference in your life. When you change your thinking, you will change your life for the better.

Spirit or God is Divine Givingness and you can use it. Classes really work when they teach you how to pray effectively. God doesn’t give you stuff for being “good” even if that is what you were taught in Sunday School. God is not an Old Man in the Sky. God is the Creative Intelligence of the Universe and it lives in you as well as all around you.

Once you understand that Spiritual Law will kick in and automatically send you any life-affirming goal you envision clearly, actually believe in, and are ready to accept, you know enough to begin. Anyone can learn to pray powerfully.

Classes in Centers for Spiritual Living are set up to teach you how to get what you want out of life. They teach you that prayer has nothing to do with begging or bargaining with a giant Humanoid who does or doesn’t give to you. Prayer is based on knowing about and using Spiritual Law.

Wouldn’t you like to be able to send a message to Universal Mind, and know it will be answered? Wouldn’t you like to connect with God and claim better relationships or more money and have prosperity and love arrive quickly on your doorstep?

One of the reasons I love Science of Mind lessons is that they are based on logic. You can follow the theory and see that it must be true that Spirit comes before any experience takes form.

I love the way our classes are aimed at helping students change their lives by changing their thoughts. Theory is great but practice is absolutely necessary. I believe life changing techniques should be taught from the beginning meeting of classes.

Yes, we learn from living life and figuring stuff out for ourselves. We have all learned and changed because of our life experiences. But experience is never a substitute for knowledge and classes are the primary path of knowledge. Therefore, classes should be filled with information and theory as well as practice and exercises in changing our thinking.

Everyone wants class lessons to help in his immediate life. How is the teacher to balance the need for practice and provide scholarly information?

Teachers usually bend and stretch the curriculum to fit the individuals who have come into their classroom orbit. It is important for the teacher to be flexible and adjust the lessons to the needs of the student.

I think Religious Science instruction is basically as good as the teacher and the students make it. The curriculum is only a starting point for adventures in learning. After seventeen years in public education, and 25 years teaching Science of Mind, I have learned to think of September as the beginning of my year. It is always exciting and it is always fun.

This year I plan to reawaken my Wise Woman materials and develop a class that any woman can teach in the future. My class starts on Sept. 13th. It is a ten week class on Saturday mornings.

This Wise Woman class is all about activity. It is about moving your mind in the direction of your dreams and taking the action you deem necessary to get there. One way to describe the curriculum might be to call it “empowerment” training.

In my younger days, (during the ‘60’s) when the Women’s Movement was in top form, we called our fledgling groups Consciousness Raising Groups. A lot of the discussions centered around getting our husbands to help with the housework.

Times change and today, most women have moved beyond blaming men for their problems. While we still have a long way to go, we have come a very long way and we are proud of it. What’s more, many husbands do help with the housework.

My Wise Woman groups were originally set up so the participants were only allowed to talk about themselves – not their men. The rules included not complaining about others. We learned we didn’t have to create strategies to get people to do what we wanted. We simply made choices for ourselves and let the rest of the world make their own choices. It was an amazing concept!

I look forward to teaching this material again. For many years, I travelled all over the US and Canada giving workshops based on my book, Wise Women don’t worry, Wise Women don’t sing the blues. It was great fun then and this is a different chapter in my life.

I’m not travelling these days, but I am planning to create a workbook that gives leaders what they need to lead groups. I look forward to creating that material during this class. I also have three great assistants to help me and that’s fun to think about.

I also led Wise Woman conferences in Desert Hot Springs for 15 years. I had wonderful co-leaders; Dr. Marilyn Hall, Dr. Heather Clark and Rev. Lisa Stewart. What fun that was! I might consider doing another workshop on the desert this Spring. Who knows?

I am definitely looking forward to my next step – teaching the Wise Woman class here in Carlsbad. It is always a great experience to help women take charge of their lives.

One of the most important concept in the Wise Woman material is the refusal to look at ourselves as victims. Just giving up that one aspect of self-identification can change anyone’s life totally.

Learning to walk on water may seem too difficult but learning to take responsibility for our lives is just as thrilling. I will be taking another look at my life as I lead the September class. I will also invite other women to take a look at their lives.

I wrote the Wise Woman book twenty years ago and times have changed. My life has certainly changed. If you are ready to become a Wise Woman, won’t you consider joining me?

Ask Yourself

Has your life changed?

Do you plan to make more changes?

Do you know what to do and how to do it?

Are you willing to drop the victim role and move ahead?


School Starts Soon

Open2School is starting soon and more young people I know are signing up for on-line classes than actually going on campus. Their college experiences will be nothing like those in the old June Allyson, Peter Lawford musicals. Times change in amazing ways.

         Sometime after Labor Day used to be the beginning of my New Year. I spent years as a student, then classroom teacher, and later, a Science of Mind instructor. That history conditioned me to celebrate new beginnings in the middle of September.

Now school starts much earlier in my neighborhood and it seems a shame to have to start so early but everything changes with time. Right now, parents are buying backpacks and new sneakers. While they’re forking over the dough, they’re hoping their kids will get dedicated teachers and that they will learn something this year.

Times change and school years also change but most of us still believe that education is critically important. We believe that free public schools strengthen the nation and we believe that the better educated we are, the more prosperous we will be. That was true when the immigrants sent their kids to school to learn English in the 1800’s and it is true now.

My personal education was all from California public schools and I have always been pleased with the quality of my teachers and classes. My high school years were rich in opportunity even though I went to school in a poor, disadvantaged neighborhood.

Banning High School in Wilmington CA had a collection of amazing (mostly female) teachers whose career opportunities were narrow. They chose teaching over nursing or secretarial work. They were brilliant women – the kind who are now making big bucks in corporations or teaching in graduate schools.

As most of my readers know, I’m all for women’s equal opportunity, but I don’t doubt the wider choices very bright women enjoy now diminished the quality of public education. I’d like to think that choice is good and the ones who choose teaching today are just as brilliant as mine were, but I don’t believe it. School staffs are not as good as they were sixty years ago.

I know there are still dedicated teachers out there but the job is different. Teachers aren’t respected. The money isn’t there. In many places, teachers are badly treated. The job has lost a lot of it’s appeal.

I am very sorry I believe schools are worse because education is more important than ever. In many places, such as Los Angeles City, students are now primarily non-Caucasian and many are poor. We still believe in the power of education to lift people up and help change their circumstances.

Good teachers make a big difference. My mother, her five sisters, and one brother were all teachers for part of their lives. I chose to teach because I needed a job and I was lucky I was as good as I was. Now I have a wonderful nephew who could have chosen many other occupations; he is a gifted, dedicated teacher.

I know my nephew does a wonderful job and I know the kids who have contact with him are fortunate. A good teacher has tremendous impact on kids who want to move up in the world. Only parents are more powerful in a kid’s life than his or her favorite teacher.

If you don’t believe me, go back and look at your own life. Make a list of your favorite teachers and what they taught you. You will see how very important teachers were to you and you can reason they are as important to today’s kids.

Every student deserves an articulate, concerned teacher who is willing to answer questions and be interesting. It may very well be that technology allows many more students to make contact with gifted specialists. I am not automatically against change. In fact, I am thrilled at how wonderfully easy it is to access information.

The fact remains that good teachers are necessary in the classroom and they are also on-line. It isn’t as much the method of delivery that makes a difference as it is the teacher’s ability to make the subject material come alive.

Information is a wonderful thing to have. Our body of information has grown so large that it has also become very important to know how to access information and research sources. I find young people have many of these marvelous skills. There is a lot to be said for having access to the world’s knowledge on your cell phone.

As the world has grown more complicated, the idea of being a well-rounded, well-informed person seems to have taken a back seat to the idea of learning a trade. This is natural in the current climate of job scarcity but the true purpose of education should be wider than earning a living. It should include a wide interest in the humanities and political science as well as the arts. Essentially, classes are designed for learning to think.

We need people with ability to learn independently and think critically if our North American nations are going to continue to prosper. It seems to me that the total population needs to be concerned that our young people are being well educated.

I am also concerned about the cost of a higher education. We seem to accept that it is an individual responsibility. I find it appalling that student’s graduate with huge student loan debt. An educated populace makes everyone in the nation greater.

I know I sound like a cranky old crank when I say that my tuition costs were never more than $40 a semester. In those days, California was so proud of their wonderful state college and junior college system. The education system was basically funded by taxing the total population. When Ronald Reagan became Governor our wonderful education system was dismantled.

I believe that education should be open to everyone who is willing to do the work. I believe that we should do everything we possibly can to make sure that students get really great teachers and really great schools. There are ways to tax the wealthy and educate everyone less expensively.

If California wants to once again be a leader, it needs to reassemble its liberal education policies. If the United States wants to maintain its position and continue to lead the world toward peace and prosperity, it must find a way to educate people without crippling them with debt.

I believe free and inexpensive public education made this nation great. It is a major key to keeping us prosperous and effective as we lead the planet toward expanding the good things of life and discovering their spiritual magnificence.

Start by saying a prayer for healthy schools. Let’s all pay attention to how we are funding our schools and make sure we are keeping them healthy and repaired. As far as I can see, education is the ultimate infrastructure.

Ask Yourself

Is there a teacher you want to thank today?

Is there a student you want to encourage today?

Is there a class you want to take?


Growing Dream

DreamUmbrellaMy daughter, Kathryn DuVivier, was approved as a CSL minister on Wed. 8/6/14. Congratulations, Kate! I know you are a marvelous minister.

I’m especially happy to have Katie join the CSL staff as a minister because she was in the first ministerial class I taught, about 20 years ago. At that time, she completed all the work but dropped out before the last steps because of other commitments.The dream grew slowly.

Kate was with me when I began the church and she has been a great supporter since the beginning. She served as Treasurer on our first Board of Trustees for several years. I cannot even remember how many volunteer tasks she’s completed in the past 25 years.

I was surprised and delighted when she decided it was time to pick up her dream again and enrolled in my ministerial class. This time, she had the time and she was able to retake all her class..

Today, she joined her classmate, Lori Mac, who was approved as a minister earlier. Now CSL Carlsbad has two new wonderful ministers to celebrate.

They are coming on the staff at a time when our Center is stretching, strengthening, and growing under the leadership of Rev. Debby ODonnell and Rev. Mattie Dobbs.

Rev. Lori and Rev. Katie, join Rev. Catherine Bonin and Rev. Ron Card as staff ministers. We also have five new Practitioners. Our enhanced staff is proof that our Center is thriving. It is very clear that the Carlsbad Center will continue to move into new possibilities.

When I started this Center 25 years ago, I was certain that my job was to teach Science of Mind. The Center has held fast to that vision under the leadership of my two former students, Rev. Debby and Rev. Mattie. They continue the tradition of excellent educational opportunities.

I am very proud of the wonderful work Rev. Debby and Rev. Mattie are doing as co-pastors. Since they took over, things have moved very smoothly. The Center continues to make teaching classes of paramount importance. It also continues to celebrate peace, serenity and love as our organizational culture.

Every Sunday, I sit in the back of the room and enjoy the service while I feel very proud and I approve of their leadership whole heartedly.

I am also proud of our new Practitioner staff; Sharon Bagley, Sal De Casas, Dee Emery, Lynn Guilfoyle, and Debra Reeves. Rev. Debby was their teacher with assistance from Kate DuVivier. I offered a bit of editing and teaching to their class. The Revs. Mattie and Catherine also offered help. We believe in sharing and helping because “We are One”.

Although we are connected, we are also very different from each other. Each of us has special skills and talents and we cooperate easily. We have plans for the future that include stretching and growing in wonderful ways. The recent graduation of the seven new practitioners and two new ministers make this a plan, not just a possibility. The Center is about to hit a major growth spurt.

Rev. Lori plans to write a book and develop a speaking and teaching ministry. Rev. Kate plans to teach classes and create an outreach program for an immigrant population. Part of the good news is that both of them plan to be staff ministers indefinitely. That means a great deal to all of us at CSL, Carlsbad.

On a personal note, I’m thrilled that Kate was able to take her ministerial training from me. This is probably the last ministerial class I will teach and Kate’s presence made it especially precious.

I love my daughter, of course. I also love every one of my students, and sometimes think of them as my sons and daughters. I am especially proud of the ones who went on to become ministers. We are part of a great enlightenment campaign that is taking place on this planet right now.

I have trained over 40 people to become RSI (and now CSL) ministers. They went in many different directions and many started churches. Milwaukee, WI, Bainbridge Island, WA, Tuscon AZ, and others  are CSL spots on the map. Wherever they are, they are all giving service to the world in some fashion.

Some of my students are retired now and many work or worked in CSL centers. Some went to work for Hospice or in other chaplain or counseling positions. Sometimes, like the doctor and counselor, they decided to use the skills they’d learned in their own private practices that are devoted to  building healthy families.

I’m also proud that many of my students helped change things within the parent organization. Liz and Jerry Hooley were two of the first co-pastors. Rev. Amy Aspell initiated one of the first focus ministries within the RSI organization. There are many other innovations that happened because of this Center. Rev. Jeanette Keil was serving as assistant minister in our Center when she became the first Chaplain to be ordained.

This Carlsbad Center has always been a teaching center and we will continue to offer many classes. Several of the new practitioners and the ministers want to teach classes. We recognize that we are here to help people change their lives and classes are the fastest route to freedom.

Twenty-five years ago, I made it my mission to teach Science of Mind. I usually taught four classes a term and many, many people prospered because of the changes they were able to make. It gives me great pleasure to hear from former students and not a week goes by that I don’t hear from one or more of them.

It is a wonderful thing to be able to look back and see that one has been useful. I know that our new staff will have exactly that experience if they continue to serve the teaching. Whether they spread their wings and fly into fascinating places, or stick close to home, a life of service is a wonderful gift to the world and to themselves.

I am so happy to celebrate the new ministers and practitioners in this post. I am also happy to celebrate the current management and the great job they are doing. This is another day to be glad in. I am very glad I chose to be a minister. I am even more glad my daughter and the other students have followed in my footsteps. We make a difference!

 

Ask Yourself

Does helping others make me happy?

Would I like to take a Science of Mind class?

Would I like to find a way to help others?


AFFIRMATIONS

AllisWell

I am working on a book called Spiritual Practice for New Thought  and this blog post comes from my chapter on affirmations. Do you use affirmations often? I do.

I had a friend who was very healthy and happy until the day she died at age 89. She did not consider herself spiritual or religious but she always started her mornings with this statement, “Another day to be glad in.” Her grandmother taught her the words when she was a young girl.

It worked well for many years for my friend and I now use it every morning before I write my gratitude list. The affirmation has been around for at least 150 years. I’ve taught to so many others that it is safe to say it is growing in popularity.

I also started using the phrase, “Way will open”, many years ago. A friend  told me it was an old Quaker saying and I loved the idea of not having to beg God, but just letting the path present itself.As a youngster, I believed it worked like magic. Every time I used it, I visualized something like the parting of the Red Sea.

Children’s books are full of affirmations. You can interpret the “Open Sesame”  from Thousand and One Nights as an affirmation. We all know the story of the little train who affirmed, “I think I can, I think I can,” as it chugged up the hill. Some of the phrases I learned as a child were; “Something will turn up”. Or “Looks like a good day,” and “Keep on trucking” were affirmations. Whether, we know it or not, our lives are filled with affirmative statements that are direct messages to God.

Many people learned to use affirmations back in the day when a French psychologist, Dr. Emile Coue’ (1857-1926) taught his followers to say, “Every day, in every way, I’m getting better and better.” Dr. Coue’ was initially interested in hypnotism, then modified his approach and called it optimistic autosuggestion. He observed that our attitudes influence our health and other aspects of our lives so he set about teaching people how to change their beliefs. He was very popular in the 1920’s and 30’s.

In his day, Coue’ was a scientific pioneer. Today, there are many scientific studies that prove the body-mind connection and we know it is a fact that an optimistic attitude positively influences the outcome of our experiences. Coue’s work made a large impression on the public because it was true.

I know from personal experience that affirmations, combined with optimism and follow-up work, can be very effective. Before I became a minister,  I built a successful writing career through hard work and using the spiritual practice of affirmations. In those days, I had 3×5 cards plastered all over my office. Each morning, as I began my work, I read the affirmations aloud. There was hardly an empty spot on a wall because there were so many cards pasted behind my typewriter. Soon, I was on the New York Times best seller list and I sold millions of copies of my teen romances that were translated into seven languages.

Affirmations are short and powerful reminders of your goals and your connection to that Helpful Force that we call God or Universal Mind or Higher Power. Affirmations are usually one sentence long. They are written in the present tense so that you know and accept that what you are seeking is already there. Keeping your affirmations definite and in the present moment is very important. It is better to say, I am at my perfect right weight than to say, I am losing weight now. The future is never here.

You need to work with your own mind until you find a statement you can actually believe. At one time I was having difficulty losing weight and I used, I am Light. because I couldn’t believe I am slim.  I also used I make healthy food choices today. Eventually, by combining what I knew about affirmations, prayer, spiritual law and nutrition, I lost more than 130 pounds.

Here are a few common affirmations you may want to adopt for your daily spiritual practice. You can use them often without any disruption of your regular activities. You can say them silently or – if you are alone – say them out loud. In these days of electronic equipment, no one will notice when you talk to yourself as you are walking or driving. Be sure and watch the road.

Thank God I am rich.

My health is excellent.

I have a wonderful memory.

I am a straight A student.

I have a wonderful lover who cares for me.

I am healthy, wealthy and wise.

My perfect mind and my perfect body work together for my perfect good.

Life is fun.

I am beautiful.

I am handsome.

I am happy.

I love life and life loves me.

I receive money from many sources including surprises.

I am a money magnet. Money comes to me easily.

The beauty of affirmations is that they are so short you can use them anywhere. You can also stick them on your bathroom mirror, your refrigerator door, or and anywhere you frequent.

One key to using affirmations effectively is to use them often.However, if you do not get the results you wish within a few weeks, you might want to consult your teacher or practitioner for more ideas about how to do the spiritual work. Long standing beliefs can be pesky.   Please remember that your true aim is to change your thinking and beliefs about whatever goals you choose. Conscious, direct spiritual work is very powerful.

Suggested Starters

Make a list of positive sayings you heard as a child that were actually affirmations.

Make a list of affirmations you remember hearing in church, on TV, or from friends.

Make a list of three affirmations you choose to use this week.

 


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